Last edited by Mazukree
Friday, May 15, 2020 | History

2 edition of poor potter of Yorktown found in the catalog.

poor potter of Yorktown

Norman F. Barka

poor potter of Yorktown

a study of a colonial pottery factory : Colonial National Historical Park Virginia

by Norman F. Barka

  • 59 Want to read
  • 11 Currently reading

Published by U.S. Dept. of the Interior, National Park Service, Denver Service Center in Denver, Colo .
Written in English

    Places:
  • Yorktown (Va.),
  • Colonial National Historical Park (Va.),
  • Virginia,
  • Yorktown.
    • Subjects:
    • Pottery, Colonial -- Virginia -- Yorktown.,
    • Historic buildings -- Virginia -- Yorktown.,
    • Yorktown (Va.) -- Antiquities.,
    • Colonial National Historical Park (Va.)

    • Edition Notes

      Other titlesColonial National Historical Park Virginia.
      StatementNorman F. Barka.
      SeriesYorktown research series ;, no. 5
      ContributionsAyres, Edward, 1943-, Sheridan, Christine., United States. National Park Service. Denver Serice Center.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsTP800.Y67 B37 1985
      The Physical Object
      Pagination3 v. :
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL2665033M
      LC Control Number85602555

      - Norman F. Barka | Archaeology of a Colonial Pottery Factory: The Kilns of Ceramics of the “Poor Potter” of Yorktown | Ceramics in America Stay safe and healthy. Please practice hand-washing and social distancing, and check out our resources for adapting to these times. The factory site is located a short walk from the Yorktown Battlefield Visitor Center, and one block from the Nelson House. The site includes remains of one kiln, as well as exhibits about the Poor Potter.

      The Swan Cove Kiln: Chesapeake Tobacco Pipe Production, Circa - Al Luckenbach Archaeology of a Colonial Pottery Factory: The Kilns and Ceramics of the "Poor Potter" of Yorktown - Norman F. Barka Yorktown's "Poor Potter": A Man Wise Beyond Discretion - Martha W. McCartney and Edward Ayres An "A-Marked" Porcelain Covered Bowl, Cherokee Clay, and Colonial America's 5/5(2). Explore our list of Yorktown, Battle of, Books at Barnes & Noble®. Receive FREE shipping with your Barnes & Noble Membership.

        Next time you go to wad your pottery for a kiln firing, think of the William Rogers pottery factory in Yorktown, Virginia. William Rogers was the proprietor of the pottery, which operated from the s until circa William Rogers is often referred to as the "Poor Potter" of : Liberty Stoneware. The award, named after William Rogers who is known as the “Poor Potter” of Yorktown, was given during the EDA’s Distinguished Business Affair, held on February 13th, , at The Freight Shed in Historic Yorktown, with over County business representatives in attendance. In the early ’s, Rogers was a highly successful.


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Poor potter of Yorktown by Norman F. Barka Download PDF EPUB FB2

: THE "POOR POTTER" OF YORKTOWN (United States National Museum BulletinContributions from the Museum of History and Technology Pa Pages ): C.

Malcolm Watkins and Ivor Noel Hume: Books5/5(1). The "poor potter" of Yorktown a study of a colonial pottery factory: Colonial National Historical Park Virginia by Norman F.

Barka. Published by U.S. Dept. of the Interior, National Park Service, Denver Service Center in Denver, Colo. Written in English. The "Poor potter" of Yorktown: a study of a colonial pottery factory: Colonial National Historical Park Virginia, Volumes Issue 5 of Yorktown research series The "Poor Potter" of Yorktown: A Study of a Colonial Pottery Factory: Colonial National Historical Park Virginia, Norman F.

Barka: Authors. texts All Books All Texts latest This Just In Smithsonian Libraries FEDLINK (US) Genealogy Lincoln Collection. National Emergency Library. Top Poor Potter of Yorktown: A Study of a Colonial Pottery Factory Item Preview remove-circle Share or Embed This Item.

Additional Physical Format: Online version: Watkins, C. Malcolm. "Poor potter" of Yorktown. Washington: Smithsonian Institution Press: [For sale by the Supt. Find helpful customer reviews and review ratings for The "poor potter" of Yorktown (v.3): a study of a colonial pottery factory: Colonial National Historical Park Virginia (Volume 3) at Read honest and unbiased product reviews from our users.

Get this from a library. The poor potter of Yorktown: Colonial National Historical Park, Virginia. [Erwin N Thompson]. Called today the "poor potter" of Yorktown, his pottery factory is the largest known enterprise of its type in Colonial America.

Yet more than years after his death, the poor potter remains a mystery. For many years the only known clues to the poor potter's existence were large deposits of pottery fragments found in Yorktown. “ The poor potter is Dead, and the Business of making potts and panns  is of little advantage to his family, and as little Damage to the Trade of our Mother Country.” – William Gooch, Royal Governor of Virginia in his status report to the Lords Commissioners for Trade and Plantations regarding Yorktown potter William Rogers.

The "poor potter" refers to Colonial entrepreneur William Rogers who operated a pottery-making industry in Yorktown in the early s.

Despite the high quality of his products and the impressive. Indeed, the "poor Potter's" sprawling factory in Yorktown was the largest known enterprise of its kind in Colonial British America. But after Rogers' death in it faded so far from view that.

The "poor potter" of Yorktown: a study of a colonial pottery factory: Colonial National Historical Park Virginia / Norman F. Barka, Edward Ayres, Christine : Norman F. Barka. Though against the law, Roger’s factory was supported by the Governor of Virginia, who always referred to Rogers as the “poor potter from Yorktown” so that he would not be seen as a threat to the imported English pottery business.

However, Rogers was anything but poor, as his factory made quality pottery on an industrial scale for the time. Article subjects include: the Swan Cove kiln, the “Poor Potter” of Yorktown, Morgan’s Town, Virginia potters and pottery, Henry Remmey and son, George N.

Fulton’s stoneware, potter James Miller, Alexandria Virginia, and the stoneware potters of Washington County, Virginia. The Poor Potter Site in Yorktown, Virginia is a historical site from approximately to showcasing the remains of a Colonial pottery factory operated by William Rogers.

Here a skilled workforce produced quality wares in direct violation of British laws that restricted industrial development in the colonies, yet he continued to operate.

Archaeologists in Yorktown, Virginia have found a well-preserved kiln site manufacturing fine stoneware pottery at a time when colonial pottery-making was banned: the illegal pottery was set up as a sign of the growing American desire for economic independence from the British Crown, and a desire to end the imposed reliance on imported British-made goods.

[ ]. Yorktown's "Poor Potter": A Man Wise Beyond Discretion William Rogers, owner of the first Virginia pottery factory known to produce stoneware, resided in Yorktown.

The extremely well-made salt-glazed stoneware and lead-glazed coarseware produced by his workers from until about were valued by consumers and enjoyed wide distribution. Archaeology of a Colonial Pottery Factory: The Kilns of Ceramics of the “Poor Potter” of Yorktown The discovery in of the “Poor Potter” manufacturing site in Yorktown, Virginia, is one of the most significant industrial finds in historical archaeology.

Information or research assistance regarding ceramics of the United States is frequently requested from the Smithsonian Institution. The following selected bibliography has been prepared to assist those interested in this topic.

This circular cuspidor was made by Bennington Pottery between and. York Paths is a program produced by WYCG TV in York County, Virginia that highlights items of historical interest in the County. This edition features the Poor Potter's Factory. The author recalls the day these incredibly significant objects were uncovered: The discovery of two well-preserved eighteenth century pottery kilns at the Poor Potter’s site in Yorktown was a rare experience for any historical archaeologist.

In addition, the finding of these two extraordinary pots at the same site was downright unbelievable. Excavations at Clay Bank in Gloucester County, Virginia,by Ivor Noël Hume -- Excavations at Tutter's Neck in James City County, Virginia,by Ivor Noël Hume -- The "Poor potter" of Yorktown, pt.The "Poor Potter" of Yorktown Factory One normally associates Yorktown, Virginia with the last major battle of the Revolutionary War, or the Peninsula Campaign during the American Civil War.

However, it also claims to be the site of America ’s first pottery factory built in Author: Janet Grunst.